"Between tonal dressing and statement knitwear, head-to-toe knits have been brought to the forefront. I appreciate the cosy yet chic approach to cold-weather dressing," says Aiken, who happens to the one of the first industry figures spotted in this trend all those months ago. "Gabriela Hearst’s knit poncho paired over a matching skirt and sweater best exemplifies this look."
Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.
It was a season where emotions, personalities and uniqueness reigned supreme. The monthlong round of shows culminated in a heart-warming and outstanding Chanel show—the last ever technically created by the late creative director, Karl Lagerfeld. An alpine scene magically assembled within Paris's Grand Palais featured a lineup of Chanel girls old and new, and a finale to rival any—with the likes of Karen Elson, unable to hold back the tears, walking through the "snow" next to Cara Delevingne, Mica Argañaraz and Penelope Cruz, to name but a few high-profile faces. The show also confirmed that one of the designer's most beloved of fabrics—bouclé—was set to be a trending choice for A/W 19.
The trench coat is so a year ago! This winter, beat the cruel winter icy with the all new form patterns for ladies, i.e. the cape. It nearly takes after a poncho, and is sufficiently adaptable to beat the various types of winter dressing. It can be worn with either sides up or down, will even now run well with some other winter piece, from over the-knee boots to the pajama style. These are best when the nonpartisan hues are picked. The poncho itself offers a layered appearance. Try not to miss this winter slant.
Like Halston, Calvin Klein epitomized disco glamour in the freewheeling late Seventies. His tight designer jeans, which clung to the sleek bodies of the greatest beauties of the day, including the young Brooke Shields, cemented his fame and made him millions of dollars. However, Calvin Klein’s reign continued well into the 80’s and 90’s – his spare, stripped-down designs offered a minimalist perspective that carried a very modern message. The use of sexuality in his ads was often a keystone of his success; his campaigns were designed to send overt messages and perhaps to shock. Today, his empire is still strong, despite some turbulence in the late nineties: his suits, dresses, and couture still offer a unique viewpoint.
I love Valentino, Tom Ford, Mary Quant, Yohi Yamamato and Donna Karen. I pull from these guys a lot for my cosplay. No, that isn’t sacrilege. Cosplay cannot be ignored as far as a money making design market goes. Top designs have trickled into cosplay and cosplay has trickled into top designs. There is just no way around it. Nor should there be. 🙂

After working for renowned fashion house Nino Cerruti, he branched out on his own, delivering his first women’s wear collection in 1974. Armani’s designs were always influenced by menswear, and his immaculate tailoring and cutting gave his pieces a timeless air. He is famous for his deconstructed jackets, which feature a softer shoulder and a longer line.


"Leather has become a key player in our wardrobes; it’s now much more accessibly priced and the breadth of styles means we can wear it all year long. Designers manipulated this fabrication which draped and felt like wool, cotton or silk," says von der Goltz. "Faux leather continues to be a rising trend, with Nanushka leading the way. Nearly half of our Nanushka buy for A/W 19 is made up of vegan leather looks."
Over in London, things were distinctly more aggressive: Punk and themes of dissonance could be felt strongly (Brexit, much?), with plenty of tartan, more safety pins than even Johnny Rotten could handle and Vivienne Westwood staging an entire protest about climate change for her show. The strong mood could clearly be felt over the Channel, too, as British designer Sarah Burton's vision for Alexander McQueen this coming season established the poshest and most brilliantly executed iteration on punk we've seen in a long, long time. And talking of being combative, if you don't pick up on the "army" theme of many of the season's biggest shows (Bottega Veneta, Chloé, Miu Miu) and end up buying a pair of combat boots, I'll eat my bucket hat.
"Last year was all about the midi dress, but for A/W 19, it's all about the minidress," says Laura Larbalestier, Group Fashion Buying Director at Harvey Nichols. "We have exciting new launches at Harvey Nichols from Retrofete, Rotate and Giuseppe di Morabito, which all involve impactful looks with mini hemlines." Newbie labels are clearly backing shorter hemlines, but the trend also has the strong support coming in from the industry's sassiest established fashion houses, such as Saint Laurent: Anthony Vaccarello's vision for the French brand was nothing if not a total lesson in getting your legs out.

One of the world’s most successful fashion designers, Diane von Fürstenberg impressed the fashion world when she introduced her now-iconic “wrap dress” for the working woman in 1972. Elegance, ease, and accessibility have always been the core of her design philosophy, which has allowed her to turn DVF into a global luxury lifestyle brand. In 2005, she became the recipient of the CFDA’s Lifetime Achievement Award.
Born in Rome in 1890 to an aristocratic mother and an intellectual father, Schiaparelli soon rebelled against the conventional life of the upper classes. Her desire for exploration and experimentation landed her in hot water as a teen, when she published a book of poems with decidedly sensual overtones. Her work deeply offended her parents, who punished her by placing her in a convent. Schiaparelli was so determined to escape from the nunnery that she initiated a hunger strike which resulted in her release. By her early twenties she had fled to London, where she could live under less scrutiny. Later, during a foray in New York, she joined with artist friends and they all made their way to Paris…
Mood board is the summary of your design collections. Put everything together like fabric, trims and also express emotions and mood on your mood board in a way that’s not just beautiful but fascinating. Remember that, your mood board is a selling tool for your ideas, so make it exciting! Mainly it’s a design tool that will help you to stay focused and consistent as your line develops. Generally it is prepare for the communication purposes and explaining your vision to others like retailers, media etc.. It is also use for creating a range or a collection.
The Pantone colour system is an internationally recognized colour referencing system where thousands of shades are numbered. If you want to select your color story, you can use Pantone to develop color standards. Pantone is a color forecasting site. Each color swatch is labeled and categorized with numbers and letters, so you can find your true color easily for designing.

It’s not hard to point out a gal that wears the cowgirl fashion style! In this particular style, there’s a few staples that are an absolute must for the wardrobe: undoubtedly an adorable cowgirl hat, typically in either some shade of brown or pink, a pair of flared blue jeans with western themed leather belt, denim jacket to match, a pair of cowgirl boots, and a few white t-shirt and plaid button-ups.

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