If there's one styling trick that was put on the map at the tail end of 2018 and looks set to continue well into this winter, it's the idea of the double jumper, or scrumper, as we called it (because it's essentially about tying another jumper around your neck as a scarf). The concept has extended even further since then, with many designer using super-cosy knits from head to toe. The chicest and easiest way to do it is with the same colour or pattern.
The college look would be the tag most suitable for the preppy look. The collared T-Shirts are matched and A-line skirts are matched with girly blouses that are lined up in their wardrobe. A cute little headband and geeky glasses mostly do accompany with this style. The geeky look might seem to be an expensive style, but it is not required to shell out much to get this look as it is not that luxurious.
The ethnic Indian wear isn’t only for the Indians any longer. Wear your saree with an advanced turn, and wrap it like an outfit. Hotshot those bends in the styles that are shaking the slope, or bring back the old present day style of Mumtaz. Still insufficient? Toss in a coat, a harvest top, a tube, or anything that gets your favor, set up of the exhausting old pullover, and include a radical new, particular measurement to the conventional 9 yards. Include a belt. Make a flat out combination to possess the saree-clad look this year.
"The footwear update this season is the square toe; from By Far to Gianvito Rossi’s two-tone boot to neutral hues at Neous and Bottega Veneta's mule," says von der Goltz. "Wandler’s new footwear line has landed already, with the square toe a key signature detail across all styles." Add that to the fact that everyone's already wearing the trend at Paris Fashion Week and you've got yourself a very big trend in the making.

Like Halston, Calvin Klein epitomized disco glamour in the freewheeling late Seventies. His tight designer jeans, which clung to the sleek bodies of the greatest beauties of the day, including the young Brooke Shields, cemented his fame and made him millions of dollars. However, Calvin Klein’s reign continued well into the 80’s and 90’s – his spare, stripped-down designs offered a minimalist perspective that carried a very modern message. The use of sexuality in his ads was often a keystone of his success; his campaigns were designed to send overt messages and perhaps to shock. Today, his empire is still strong, despite some turbulence in the late nineties: his suits, dresses, and couture still offer a unique viewpoint.

The opposite to butter yellow, yet just as popular, neon segues from summer 2019 well into autumn and winter, coming up in surprising combinations: Who knew flouro green could work so well with brown? Or that highlighter yellow was friends with dark denim? Either way, you've had more than ample time in 2019 already to get used to the idea, so don't go packing away your summer brights when the colder weather comes.
Born in August of 1883, Gabrielle Chanel was a French native who was destined to liberate women from the constraints of corsets and other uncomfortable garments. A true rebel and visionary, Chanel, who changed her name to Coco after a brief career as a singer, preferred to wear clothes she could move freely in; often, her style were imbued with a mannish aesthetic. Indeed, Coco Chanel, who designed her first cardigan to avoid pulling any garment over her head, was really the originator of modern women’s sportswear. Her desire for freedom and self-expression gave women style without sacrifice…
The top icon of fashion design, Elsa Schiaparelli was born on September 10, 1890, in Italy. After working at a boutique in New York, Schiaparelli moved to Paris, where she began designing her own clothes. Her work and sense of style shaped the look of fashion in the 1920s and ’30s, and her clothes were worn by some of the world’s most famous women, including American actress Greta Garbo. Schiaparelli died in Paris on November 13, 1973.
Intelligent and pragmatic, Chanel used her powers of seduction to gain a foothold in the competitive fashion world; in succession, she became the mistress of two powerful and wealthy men. Both of her lovers were quite happy to use their money and influence to give her a start in business. From a beginning as a milliner, she rose to prominence in 1920, when her signature fragrance, the incredibly iconic Chanel No. 5, was launched.

Son of Russian working class immigrants, Ralph Lauren has transformed himself into the sophisticated billionaire. His classic and preppy designs all draw upon an image of old world wealth and luxury, and he pioneered the concept of clothes as part of a lifestyle environment. Lauren worked in retail before developing a line of neckties. The brand he established, Polo, is now one part of an empire that includes fragrances, home furnishings and luxury clothing. Today, his five billion dollar business includes several clothing lines as well as perfumes, house ware, furniture and paint.
Yamamoto was born in Yokohama, Japan on October 3, 1943. He studied law at Keio University and graduated in 1966 with a law degree. He continued his studies on fashion design at the famous Bunkafukuso Gakuin, a fashion institute in Tokyo. Yamamoto blends the exotic and powerful designs of traditional Japanese dress with Western daywear, and achieves a unique, abstract style.  He is an uncompromising, nontraditional designer.  Yamamoto drapes and wraps the body in unstructured, loose, voluminous garments, similar in style and philosophy to those of Rei Kawakubo.  Many of his clothes have additional flaps, pockets and straps.
London designer Mary Quant was not only an iconic fashion design but also the imortal creator of the miniskirt. Mary had an art-school background and had been designing and manufacturing her own clothes since second half of the twentieth century. She was convinced that fashion needed to be affordable to be accessible to the young, she opened her own retail boutique, Bazaar, on the Kings Road in 1955, introducing the “mod” era and the “Chelsea look.”
I don't think I've ever seen so many trends! The autumn/winter 2019 fashions are, to say the least, varied, vast and very much going to suit your style, whatever that may be. If you're a minimalist, there's much to love. If you're a maximalist, this is an epic time for you too. If you like colour, great. If you hate colour, fabulous! Want to dress like you're permanently at a party? That's an entirely legitimate planned, backed by many big industry hitters, including Marc Jacobs and Versace.
Like Halston, Calvin Klein epitomized disco glamour in the freewheeling late Seventies. His tight designer jeans, which clung to the sleek bodies of the greatest beauties of the day, including the young Brooke Shields, cemented his fame and made him millions of dollars. However, Calvin Klein’s reign continued well into the 80’s and 90’s – his spare, stripped-down designs offered a minimalist perspective that carried a very modern message. The use of sexuality in his ads was often a keystone of his success; his campaigns were designed to send overt messages and perhaps to shock. Today, his empire is still strong, despite some turbulence in the late nineties: his suits, dresses, and couture still offer a unique viewpoint.
The girl next door. The classic style that’s been around for ages. This fashion style doesn’t pay attention to the latest trends and doesn’t involve anything wild or exotic. This trend focuses on simplicity and cuteness, with a striped tee, shorts, and tennis shoes enough to make her happy. At the end of the day, she just wants to be adorable and casual!
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