I can’t think of a more surreal experience than being in class at a fashion school, finding out your designs are on the cover of WWD, leaving class to go get a copy and coming back to your professor yelling at you. Exactly one year ago today, this happened to Alan Eckstein, one half of Timo Weiland. If that's not an indicator of good things to come for a brand new designer, I don't know what is. It seems like overnight, Timo Weiland and Alan Eckstein--two very young self-proclaimed "fashion geeks" with no technical training--grew a small line of neckwear into a successful full-fledged men's and women's clothing line that will show at Lincoln Center on Sunday. Also an integral part of the team, Donna Kang, the only one with a technical fashion background, is behind the scenes helping to make beautiful things happen. Together, they are unstoppable. We sat down with them in their tiny garment district office/studio to try to figure out how they came together and made all this happen in such a short a mount of time.
Women who enjoy the artsy style tend to stay away from the traditional ‘trends’ of the fashion world and love to make a statement with their clothing. Oftentimes they will be the creator of their own fashions, designing and creating their own blouses, hats, and jackets. Each artsy style will be different per woman, as everyone has their own idea of what ‘art’ truly is. That’s what makes this particular fashion style so unconventional and interesting.
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These boys Abu-Jani and Sandeep Khosla, as a duo are legendary in the fashion-circuit and earned success, hype, fame and attention. They were the first and the foremost to exhibit their work at Harrods, the UK luxury store. Though they lack in pro training, yet their designs are exclusive, distinctive and remarkable. All the time, they travel to the distant and remote areas in quest of the hidden-styles that are yet to be exposed. This creative coalition exudes talent and attitude!

Instagram isn't just valuable for getting your work out there — clients also care about how many people you'll reach if they commission you. “I think for brands that it’s super important to work with someone who also has an audience, because [the brand is] getting the work and they are getting a little bit of advertising as well,” says Rodgers, who now has 435,000 Instagram followers.


While Morrison and Walton both maintain blogs (Travel Write Draw and Markers and Macrons, respectively), they got into the illustration game even more recently than Rodgers, and to hear them tell it, it’s all about Instagram. Morrison got the industry's attention — and built up her own Instagram following — by illustrating looks by prominent designers and street style stars in the hopes that they would regram her, which they often would. Then, in September 2014, Morrison was one of Instagram’s featured users, and her follower count soared from around 8,000 to 145,000 in three weeks. “Instagram has been the number one catalyst for all of my my commissions over the past six months,” she says.
Hairstyles, color, and textures can do a lot of an overall design. Different types of hairstyles may be worn by different people for a variety of reasons. Consider the way in which culture and ethnic heritage may affect the types of hairstyles a figure could wear. Not only will you be telling a story about who the person is or where they may be from, but you’ll also be allowing limits for the hair’s movement and style itself. 

That is certainly the experience of Anna Laurini (@annalauriniblue) who has seen her street work welcomed into the fashion art family with voracious enthusiasm. Having studied at Central Saint Martins, Laurini began to emblazon her signature Cubist-influenced, red-lipped face across billboards in Shoreditch and Mayfair “as a break from the studio” and is now regularly called upon for collaborations, most recently by Rupert Sanderson and Japanese label Black by Moussy. “It’s surprised me how popular my work has been in fashion terms,” she says. “I never expected it.” And again, Anna says, it’s the audience that is key to the success of her work. “I never give the woman a story as I paint her,” she says. “It’s really up to the viewer; people often tells me that my work resonates with their particular mood. I like that it’s relatable on a personal level.”


In the 60’s, Valentino made a decision that would enhance his reputation; he sent Jacqueline Kennedy, the American First Lady and fashion icon, a series of his pieces to look over. She was enchanted with his designs, and even chose to wear one of his dresses when she married her second husband, Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis: her influence led to greater fame and fortune in North America.
In the 60’s, Valentino made a decision that would enhance his reputation; he sent Jacqueline Kennedy, the American First Lady and fashion icon, a series of his pieces to look over. She was enchanted with his designs, and even chose to wear one of his dresses when she married her second husband, Greek shipping tycoon Aristotle Onassis: her influence led to greater fame and fortune in North America.

“It was the death of the last grand master, René Bouché, in 1963 which really signified the end of classic fashion illustration,” says David Downton, who has almost single handedly kept illustration in the limelight over the last 20 years having sketched in the front row of the couture shows for the last 40 seasons straight; illustrated countless celebrities for Vanity Fair and, in 2009, drawn Cate Blanchett for a record-selling anniversary issue of Australian Vogue - as well as having played “artist in residence” at Claridges for the last decade where he can often be found in Le Fumoir sketching anyone from Julianne Moore or Grace Jones to Michael Caine. “It coincided with the rise of the celebrity photographers - and fashion always voraciously wants what is new.”
Known as the champion of star-spangled glamour, Tommy Hilfieger‘s favorite trends go from red, white and blue. Since introducing his first collection in 1985, no designer has become more closely associated with Ivy League prep than Tommy Hilfiger. After building his company on the modernization of all-American men’s wear, and winning the CFDA Menswear Designer of the Year award in 1995, Hilfiger introduced women’s wear in 1996 and sold the company for $1.6 billion ten years later.

It’s also an aggression-free means of emotional expression in a world which can all too easily descend into trolling bile, and worse. “The collaboration with Gucci increased my following by 30k almost overnight and yet I didn’t receive one negative comment,” says Downie. Even when her work has generated controversy, she doesn’t enter verbal (or text) discussion. “I just paint the answer.”
Colour is a basic consideration in the fashion design process. In most cases color is the first element that is noticed about a design and has a huge impact in how that garment is perceived. Different forecasting companies research and develop new and existing colour palettes from many sources like yarn technologists, international fabric fairs, leather suppliers, trimming merchants etc. some fashion magazine give inspirational colour guideline for fashion design.
Fashion. Fashion is completely transparent. It’s fun, it’s confusing, and it never dies off. Fashions from the past are still being worn by women across the country and new fashions are being designed every day. There’s SO many different fashion styles, and we’ve come up with a list of the top 20 looks, from elegant to gothic, exotic to casual, and everything in between.
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