Consider the idea, explored above, of only drawing shoes and handbags. In order to make those objects seem tangible without having a figure within your illustration to help, draw them as though they not only exist in space, but exist on a plane and someone could reach out and touch them. That will allow the viewer to better connect with the object and understand the size and shape of the object. 

Valentino is known for his flamboyant lifestyle and his love of luxury and beauty. He lives with his lover of 50 years in a series of lush villas throughout the world. His jet-set lifestyle and extensive collection of priceless art are not the only rewards he has received for his talents: France’s President Chirac also awarded him the Legion d’Honneur in 2006.
Known as the prince of Prints, the fashion designer Emilio Pucci got known for his tight shantung “Pucci pants” and vividly printed silk dresses and blouses. His colorful, informal uniforms for Braniff flight attendants were groundbreaking. Later, Pucci branched into men’s fashions, perfume, and ceramics. He also served as a member of the Italian Parliament. His color trends and designs are one of KOKET’s most lovable inspirations.
Gianni Versace launched his first clothing line in Milan, Italy, in 1978. In 1989, Versace debuted his first couture collection. He became known for his glamorous styles, producing a range of siren dresses that became his trademark. Gianni Versace was also known for his marketing genius, turning nameless models into international superstars and regularly recruiting celebrities for his campaigns. Gianni Versace was murdered in 1997. Nevertheless, the house Versace is one of the most know and admired luxury fashion trends until our days.

As illustration has emerged as a tool for cutting through the visual noise of social media, it has itself benefitted from social media’s own disruption of the traditional barometers of quality. Just as David Bowie prophesied in his famous 1999 Newsnight interview that the internet would demystify the relationship between artist and audience, social media has “smashed down the gatekeepers”, says Downie, who doesn’t consider a picture finished until it’s given a “moment of birth” by being published on her Instagram account. “I cried when I saw that Bowie interview,” she says. “It’s so profoundly right, and it’s exactly what happened with my work.”


It’s not always apparent if you’re looking at a stylized fashion figure that the artist is at their best when working from anatomically correct proportions. Knowing how to correctly draw a body allows for a variety of freedom when drawing figures and correctly drawing clothing. So whether you’re drawing from photographic reference or from life, you’ll be prepared with knowledge of the shape and proportions of what may not be visible when drawing clothed figures.
Whatever the catalyst, fashion illustration is having 'a moment’. It has been fidgeting the industry for some time - perhaps since Nick Knight introduced Helen Downie’s Unskilled Worker into fashion's limelight two years ago, and it’s now truly kicking. Grace Coddington and Michael Robert’s GingerNutz story in our December issue - whose cover itself generated a multitude of illustrated versions that flooded the social channels - stands as definitive proof. The video of Coddington talking about it generated 10,000 views in its first twelve hours on YouTube, while Caroline Stein’s Instagram version of Pat McGrath’s LABS generated 100 likes-a-minute for the first hour it was live. People clearly like looking at it.
Much like showing the texture, weight, and limits of movement within a textile, being able to render various objects so the viewer understands what they’re comprised of not only helps communicate concept design and storytelling within a fashion illustration, but also allows the viewer to better connect with what’s been drawn as being analogous to a real-world object or familiar material.

Hi there, my name is Simeon Elson. I am an international freelance illustrator based in the UK. My client list includes the likes of Microsoft, BT Diesel, and Penguin Books. In this course we're going to create a stunning 2D fashion illustration in Photoshop and Illustrator from a stock reference image. Some of the key takeaways from watching this course will include how to prepare a stock image in Photoshop before crossing over into Illustrator to create a vibrant, striking vector portrait using predominantly the pen tool and creating your own brushes. Then back at Photoshop we will add some cool mixed media elements such as watercolors, and hand-drawn shapes to inject life and a sense of motion into the composition. By the end of the training you will have learned how to create a professional, energetic, realistic fashion illustration combing vector and mixed media elements. I'm excited to work with Digital Tutors and share these techniques with you. So let's get started with the first lesson.


The top icon of fashion design, Elsa Schiaparelli was born on September 10, 1890, in Italy. After working at a boutique in New York, Schiaparelli moved to Paris, where she began designing her own clothes. Her work and sense of style shaped the look of fashion in the 1920s and ’30s, and her clothes were worn by some of the world’s most famous women, including American actress Greta Garbo. Schiaparelli died in Paris on November 13, 1973.
A leading name who embarked on the world of fashion in 1980’s. She won the Yuv Rattan Award and is counted among the modern-designers of the country. Best known for her theme collections, and focuses on silhouettes and is always busy in experimentation and introducing new trends! Rina-Dhaka has arranged shows in Paris, London, Singapore, Hong-Kong, New-York, Jakarta & Dubai . Rina’s Singapore shows in 2001 nd 2002 were her major victory! Even “Vogue” and “Elle” (International megazines) have featured ‘er work and fashion-designing is now her family business as her brothers Shantanu and Nikhil also joined her in late 90’s.
Consider, for full-bodied pieces, what sort of stories can be told with the addition of accessories. Imagine drawing a beautiful, historical queen. What sort of accessories would she wear? Crown, jewelry, fancy shoes, and a scepter, perhaps. You can tell a story of decadence the more accessories you add, or of simplicity by only featuring a small bracelet or simple necklace within a design.

Vivienne Westwood, the godmother of punk, is considered one of the most unconventional and outspoken fashion designers in the world. Westwood’s fashions woke to fame in the late 1970s when her early designs helped shape the look of the punk rock movement. The highly influential shop changed its name and décor with every collection, and would later be credited for setting off both the punk trend and the new romantic wave. In 1981, Westwood launched her signature collection and has since continued to shock and amuse the fashion world with her hard-core Anglomania.
A little trick i do for when i sketch clothes is not giving a lot of matter over the long of the girl in the sketch, actually a lot of designers draw really (REALLY) long women, mostly because it helps visualize their designs and also cause models are freaky tall …. but it help me with clothes :3 to focus on style, instead of focusing over anatomy. (draw long and short girls! it doesnt matter)
A girly fashion style can most easily be described as the popular vintage style. Most of her outfits consist of plenty of beautiful lace as well as ruffles, hearts, flowers, and pale colors, especially pink and white. She’s a romantic at heart and wants to be treated like a lady at all times. She’s awaiting her prince charming and thus, adorns herself with only the girliest and most lovely fashions.
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